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Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2018 4:39 am
by def
I only ordered the book because i hope there is some info about the Bad Englisch years. For no other reason...

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2018 5:01 am
by perryfan61
def wrote:I only ordered the book because i hope there is some info about the Bad Englisch years. For no other reason...


He does include some details about this time.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2018 5:43 am
by lparn
I had ordered the kindle version of the book for $10
Just recieved an email stating it was cancelled by the publisher :!: :?:

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2018 10:17 am
by tj
lparn wrote:I had ordered the kindle version of the book for $10
Just recieved an email stating it was cancelled by the publisher :!: :?:


That seems odd. I would think that Kindle books are much more profitable, even at $10. What is the hardcover selling for?

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2018 12:19 pm
by perryfan61
tj wrote:
lparn wrote:I had ordered the kindle version of the book for $10
Just recieved an email stating it was cancelled by the publisher :!: :?:


That seems odd. I would think that Kindle books are much more profitable, even at $10. What is the hardcover selling for?


16.99 US, 21.99 CAD. Cheaper through Amazon.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2018 7:08 pm
by tater1977
Journey's Jonathan Cain

http://www.antimusic.com/morley/18/JonathanCain.shtml


antiMusic: You're busy with a summer tour heading into October but can you foresee new music coming from Journey in the near future?

Jonathan: I'm going to dabble, yeah. I've got some ideas and I know Neal does. We're going to get together and put our heads together and see if we can't come up with something, some cool new places to go with our music.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2018 7:46 pm
by tater1977
JONATHAN CAIN - The Journey Keyboardist and Songwriter on His New Memoir "Don’t Stop Believin’"
Jon RegenMay 1, 2018

https://www.keyboardmag.com/artists/jon ... p-believin

KM - Everybody assumes that success cures all, but your book talks about how fame itself is not a panacea. Here you are - one of the most successful songwriters of our generation, saying you’re not a complete person just because you have a million dollars in the bank or because your songs are on the radio.

JC - Exactly. And it’s constantly looking into areas where the weaknesses are and trying to shore them up. Honestly, when [singer] Steve Perry left the band, I had to become the lyricist, because there wasn’t anybody else doing it. So I hired a few of my friends to come in and "babysit" me through that season of building confidence and saying, “I got this.” And the more I spent time with these guys, I could just go there. I guess that’s what I always wanted. I wanted freedom and I didn’t want to doubt about what I was doing. So when the Arrival album came around, I had some friends that were very good writers that I sat down with. And that kind of got me over the hump. With Revelation, I was writing with Neal [Schon] and taking it all on, not even thinking about it or questioning it. It’s just a muscle. You’ve got to use it everyday. With my Christian music, I’m continuing to use that muscle. I just wrote like three or four new songs and I’m singing them tomorrow. People say to me, "You never stop." I say, “No, I don’t!”

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2018 3:18 am
by tater1977
Jonathan Cain on the Release of his New Book, Don’t Stop Believin – The Music Was Bigger Than All Of Us, and We Believed In It!

Robert Cavuoto

https://myglobalmind.com/2018/05/11/jon ... ved-in-it/

Robert Cavuoto: Your 1996 CD, Trial by Fire is also great, but things started to unravel with Steve, looking back if that was the band’s last attempt at a reunion CD are you satisfied with it?

Jonathan Cain: Yes! It was very, very good. For the amount of gas we had in the tank being all together and the drama that was going on around us; we are lucky that we even made it! There were so much indecision and uncertainty; we knew that we were on the edge of a cliff with it. It was originally supposed to be a farewell with four or five gigs just to say goodbye. Then Neal had the idea of making an album [laughing]! We had to coax Steve into it, but when the three of us got around the piano, the ideas were coming just like in the old days. The beauty of the reunion was that we hadn’t lost a beat. Do I wish we made more albums? Yeah, I do, but I’m happy with that one. I think it makes a statement and we sounded great. It wasn’t the old Steve that was making that album with us. You can tell he was at odds with things, and what can you do? You just have to be happy with what was happening. It was a miracle record for me, and I’m sure Neal feels the same way.

Robert Cavuoto: Do you think the fans have given up on a potential reunion with Steve and would welcome another Journey CD with singer Arnel Pineda?

Jonathan Cain: The door has always been open to Steve! He knows where we live and he can always get a hold of us. You would have to ask him that question. I have to respect his private life as he wants to keep it private.

We haven’t given up on making a new CD; it’s just that the market has changed so much. We have to be careful when making a new offering. We have to map it out, so it makes sense economically. Bands burn money! They are money burning machines [laughing] I’m encouraged that we can do one. I think Neal and I are going to have to rope Arnel in. We know what we need to do. I have been making Christian music, and it has given me a mastery of putting things together. When I come to the studio, I have everything arranged and ready to go. If we apply that approach, we should be able to knock things out in a week or two. That is why I think we have to be a little organized about the recording.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2018 4:51 am
by efrasjourney
tater1977 wrote:...It was originally supposed to be a farewell with four or five gigs just to say goodbye. Then Neal had the idea of making an album [laughing]! We had to coax Steve into it, but when the three of us got around the piano, the ideas were coming just like in the old days.[/b]


Very interesting, did not know that, hmmm

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2018 7:26 am
by perryfan61
I wonder how SP " was at odds with things"? Sounds like they still had that great writing chemistry between them. Something else must have been going on.

Glad they turned a farewell tour into a new album, and that they could convince SP to get on board. One of my favourite albums too.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2018 1:48 pm
by The_Noble_Cause
tater1977 wrote:
We haven’t given up on making a new CD; it’s just that the market has changed so much. We have to be careful when making a new offering. We have to map it out, so it makes sense economically. Bands burn money! They are money burning machines [laughing] I’m encouraged that we can do one. I think Neal and I are going to have to rope Arnel in. We know what we need to do. I have been making Christian music, and it has given me a mastery of putting things together. When I come to the studio, I have everything arranged and ready to go. If we apply that approach, we should be able to knock things out in a week or two. That is why I think we have to be a little organized about the recording.


Part of me thinks Jon is just saying these things to lead Journey fans on and make them buy his book.

Regarding his producing/ engineering skills... I haven't bought his recent religious solo albums so I can't comment on that. At this point, a sonically inferior Journey album is better than no Journey album.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2018 6:56 am
by JourneyHard
So, it was supposed to be four or five concerts in 1996? Without Trial By Fire, I would guess the set list would be much like Steve Perry's solo tour. It would have been mostly Journey songs, but with some Steve Perry solo stuff sprinkled in. I wonder if they would have recorded them and then take the best performances and released a Live Concert album.

Anyhow, I have a bad feeling about the new album. It might be the first Journey album without Neal Schon. Meanwhile, Neal does an album with the Gregg Rolie version of Journey. I am just guessing, but this is the way it seems to be panning out.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2018 12:29 pm
by PianoMan1986
The_Noble_Cause wrote:
tater1977 wrote:
We haven’t given up on making a new CD; it’s just that the market has changed so much. We have to be careful when making a new offering. We have to map it out, so it makes sense economically. Bands burn money! They are money burning machines [laughing] I’m encouraged that we can do one. I think Neal and I are going to have to rope Arnel in. We know what we need to do. I have been making Christian music, and it has given me a mastery of putting things together. When I come to the studio, I have everything arranged and ready to go. If we apply that approach, we should be able to knock things out in a week or two. That is why I think we have to be a little organized about the recording.


Part of me thinks Jon is just saying these things to lead Journey fans on and make them buy his book.

Regarding his producing/ engineering skills... I haven't bought his recent religious solo albums so I can't comment on that. At this point, a sonically inferior Journey album is better than no Journey album.


TNC, what are your thoughts on the line "I think Neal and I are going to have to rope Arnel in" regarding a new album/project? Just curious...

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2018 11:28 pm
by The_Noble_Cause
JourneyHard wrote:Anyhow, I have a bad feeling about the new album. It might be the first Journey album without Neal Schon.


As Neal is really the only person in the current lineup wanting to do new music, this is pretty much impossible.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2018 11:29 pm
by The_Noble_Cause
PianoMan1986 wrote:TNC, what are your thoughts on the line "I think Neal and I are going to have to rope Arnel in" regarding a new album/project? Just curious...


Really not sure. My guess is Arnel likes to go home after the tour and doesn't want to spend weeks in a studio.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2018 9:48 am
by JourneyHard
The_Noble_Cause wrote:
JourneyHard wrote:Anyhow, I have a bad feeling about the new album. It might be the first Journey album without Neal Schon.


As Neal is really the only person in the current lineup wanting to do new music, this is pretty much impossible.


What I mean is Jon is saying how he wants to take Journey is a new direction or something. What does he mean? Is he going to make Journey into a Christian Rock Band? If so, Neal will be gone so fast. Jon can pump out these Christian albums really fast. He could make a Journey Rock Album really fast. That is my thinking.

And what does Jon mean about "rope Arnel in?" Neal is the one he has to "rope in" and stop all his long guitar solos on all the new songs. But if Jon tries that, Neal is gone so fast.

It is funny how Jon thinks Journey's management is doing a great job. Jon is very talented writing music and performing, but his business skills are zero. For the record, Journey's management is horrible. Another tour with Def Leppard is the best they can come up with? Really?

Journey should be touring solo. They are that good that they should be a huge draw alone. But if they want to tour with somebody else, I would love to see them with Pat Benatar, or Bad Company, or Whitesnake or somebody different.

A new Journey album should allow Neal to jam as much as he wants. Anything else is just another Raised on Radio. I feel better now that I got all of this off my chest.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2018 10:36 am
by The_Noble_Cause
JourneyHard wrote:What I mean is Jon is saying how he wants to take Journey is a new direction or something. What does he mean? Is he going to make Journey into a Christian Rock Band? If so, Neal will be gone so fast. Jon can pump out these Christian albums really fast. He could make a Journey Rock Album really fast. That is my thinking.

And what does Jon mean about "rope Arnel in?" Neal is the one he has to "rope in" and stop all his long guitar solos on all the new songs. But if Jon tries that, Neal is gone so fast.

It is funny how Jon thinks Journey's management is doing a great job. Jon is very talented writing music and performing, but his business skills are zero. For the record, Journey's management is horrible. Another tour with Def Leppard is the best they can come up with? Really?

Journey should be touring solo. They are that good that they should be a huge draw alone. But if they want to tour with somebody else, I would love to see them with Pat Benatar, or Bad Company, or Whitesnake or somebody different.

A new Journey album should allow Neal to jam as much as he wants. Anything else is just another Raised on Radio. I feel better now that I got all of this off my chest.


This is a rambling tirade worthy of Real Music Observer. You claim Jonathan is a crappy businessman, meanwhile Neal's Soul Sirkus couldn't fill a phone booth. Ross's Mouthman kids apparel isn't flying off the shelves either. Red 13 proved that BOTH Jonathan and Neal lack business savvy.

Anyway...

Cain's not going to try to turn Journey into a religious band. That's not happening. And even if he tries, Eclipse was already full of spiritual mumbo jumbo anyway.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2018 7:04 am
by lparn
Found the book on google play
$9
Am about 1/4 into it very interesting so far

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2018 7:35 am
by lparn
It is funny how Jon thinks Journey's management is doing a great job. Jon is very talented writing music and performing, but his business skills are zero. For the record, Journey's management is horrible. Another tour with Def Leppard is the best they can come up with? Really?

Journey should be touring solo. They are that good that they should be a huge draw alone. But if they want to tour with somebody else, I would love to see them with Pat Benatar, or Bad Company, or Whitesnake or somebody different.
[/quote]

I agree 100% i can't fathom the amount of money they must have been offered to do this tour considering their relationship
Jon mentions in one of the interviews that theyre leasing a plane a
I think touring solo would allow a longer setlist besides the gh
Maybe

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2018 10:44 am
by JourneyHard
For the record, Jonathan Cain and Neal Schon are both not good businessmen. Herbie Herbert will tell you the same thing. They are awesome at what they do which is write songs and perform the songs. Nobody is better at that. But I just want to know who their management is. Perhaps they are their own management. I don't know.

It seems Jon is yearning for another Journey album that is a major hit. Fans who would want new music do NOT care if it is a hit album or not. Odds are it won't be a hit.

The only way Journey could get a Major Hit Album now is if they hired every major rapper and made rap versions of the dirty dozens with samples of those dirty dozen songs that included Steve Perry on vocals. The album would be pure crap, but in today's market it would sell like wild fire. If Jon wants to sell his soul to the devil, he can have a major hit Journey album again, but I doubt Steve Perry would sign off on it, or Neal Schon for that matter.

It does seem like Jon is stringing fans and Neal along with empty promises of a new Journey album. It may or may not happen, but it doesn't look good. Maybe Jon has learned from Steve Perry. Promise a new album and then sit back and watch the fans go wild.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2018 11:16 am
by verslibre
JourneyHard wrote:Promise a new album and then sit back and watch the fans go wild.


All 1758 of them. How the mighty have fallen. :lol:

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2018 4:26 pm
by steveo777
verslibre wrote:
JourneyHard wrote:Promise a new album and then sit back and watch the fans go wild.


All 1758 of them. How the mighty have fallen. :lol:


I had those kinds of thoughts last time we took my sister to see Dave Mason/The Doobie brothers/Journey. The venue held 18,500 and when Mason opened, the place was less than 1/4 full. My sister was like, not many people here, is Journey still relevant? By the time The Doobies came on, it was about half full. Once Journey hit the stage, the place was full to the gills. So, out of that lineup, Journey was still the main attraction. Now an album, that might be a different story.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2018 1:18 am
by The_Noble_Cause
verslibre wrote:
All 1758 of them. How the mighty have fallen. :lol:


Compared to what? Styx? Boston? Foreigner? All of their peers are pretty much in the same boat.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2018 1:23 am
by The_Noble_Cause
JourneyHard wrote:For the record, Jonathan Cain and Neal Schon are both not good businessmen. Herbie Herbert will tell you the same thing. They are awesome at what they do which is write songs and perform the songs. Nobody is better at that. But I just want to know who their management is. Perhaps they are their own management. I don't know.


Here's an interview with their manager below.
Note - JSS disputes the claim that he used a devise to change octaves. Also Augeri was a maintenance manager for GAP. He didn't sell pants.

The Journey of Journey

http://www.pollstarpro.com/NewsContent. ... eID=822824
By Gideon Gottfried

Posted Friday, February 12, 2016

At Pollstar Live! promoter legend Danny Zelisko hosted a panel with the people who have been instrumental in Journey’s continued success: John Baruck (Frontline Management/Artist Nation), Tim Jorstad (Jorstad, Incorporated) and Rob Kern (Rob Kern Production Services).

Baruck decided to pick up the story in the mid-’90s, after the iconic band’s 10-year hiatus. “Irving Azoff put the band together again, I think at Neal [Schon]’s insistence, to make another record and do a big tour.”

The result was Trial by Fire, which was released in 1996, the last album to feature original lead singer Steve Perry. A tour was scheduled, but Perry hurt his hip and the band decided to go without him. “Jonathan found Steve Augeri selling pants at The Gap in New York City. He had that high tenor voice.”


Zelisko continued: “Remember, this was at a time when superstar bands weren’t necessarily replacing singers. Now it’s commonplace.”


When veteran agent Nick “The Greek” Caris found out that Zelisko wanted to tour without Perry, he called him crazy. At first it seemed he would be proven right, because out of 40 potential cities, Zelisko only got eight positive answers with Vancouver eventually canceling. The remaining seven shows sold out.


“The new Journey was born. The music itself took a life of its own, and it will [do so] forever,” Zelisko said. “Radio stations refused to play the music, because how dare we enter into doing Journey without Steve Perry,” Baruck added. “Turns out, the songs won.” “Journey’s got what we call the dirty dozen. They’ve got 12 songs on the greatest hits record which sold over 15 million copies, and people come to hear those songs. If we make new records, we don’t play the new songs. We go out there, we do our hits, and it always works.”


Baruck cultivated the concept of package tours, putting Journey on stage with other classic rock bands. “It enabled us to tour more often, a major market tour every two to three years, some secondaries and casinos [in between]. And it worked. It worked all the way through to 2007, when we did the Def Leppard tour and Steve Augeri lost his voice completely.” Schon’s friend Jeff Scott Soto filled in. “He had this little device. When he stepped on it, it changed the octave, so he could sing the high notes,” Baruck revealed.


It sufficed to complete the tour, but it wasn’t a permanent solution. The band found Arnel Pineda on YouTube. Before taking the new guy on tour, however, a warm-up date in Vina del Mar, Chile, was scheduled. “The old guys were just sitting up on stage, strumming their instruments, but Arnel was running around in circles. I was livid. I told Arnel after the show, that this was not what we do. That it was about the songs, the vocals. That he needed to just stand there and sing. I made him cry, and he threatened to go home, as he did probably every day of the [ensuing] tour. We did a 105 shows that year.”


Kern shed some more light on the band package tours. He emphasized that there was no space for politics: “We don’t use terms like opening act or headliner. Everybody is looked after well, everybody gets their time on stage. “It’s all about playing these hits, and the catalogue of every band John [Baruck] puts together speaks for itself.”


Eliminating politics entirely isn’t always possible. Some acts like Steve Miller Band will insist on their name being printed on posters side-by-side with Journey’s, and in the same size. “I don’t care,” said Baruck. “It’s all about the show. The band understands that.”


Tim Jorstad, the band’s business manager, shared some interesting numbers: “Back in 1982, 85 percent of Journey’s publishing revenues came from mechanical royalties, which is the sale of music. Today about 35 percent are mechanicals, the rest is set fees and performance revenues.”


Jorstad also talked ticket sales: “From 1999 to 2015 we’ve had two down years. 2010 was completely off, as we worked on an album. 2007 there was very little touring. Some figures are estimates, but there’s very good records from 2004 forwards.“ In the period from 1999 to 2015, Journey sold 4.5 million tickets and generated a box office gross of $270 million. Ticket sales dramatically picked up from 2008 forward.


“This band is reinventing and rebuilding itself. It’s a tribute to smart management, excellent musicianship, strong work ethic, and a great catalogue for which fans are fortunately willing to pay time and time again.” 40 percent of publishing royalties are attached to “Don’t Stop Believing.” 95 percent of Journey’s publishing comes from eight songs.


HBO licensing “Don’t Stop Believing” to conclude the finale of “The Sopranos” in 2007 gave the band a huge boost. Steve Perry, who had to agree, of course, “wanted to make sure that the song wasn’t going to be played when Tony Soprano lay on the floor with blood gushing out of his head,” Baruck remembered. “So Steve went down to the set and met with director. He knew the ending before anybody else in the world.”


Another licensing deal that “brought us a whole new fanbase”, according to Baruck, was the TV show Glee. “Young people, who, quite frankly, have no idea who Steve is."


The many DJs worldwide playing “Don’t Stop Believing” to finish their sets, kept the name Journey alive as well, he said.


The most famous person to have ever been refused a Journey license is Hillary Clinton. She wanted the song for her campaign. “We stopped that. We try to stay out of politics,” said Baruck.


Another anecdote the manager shared concerned the search for a new lead singer. “Before Arnel we tried out a tribute singer, who really looked like Steve. He had all the moves. But we couldn’t do it. It was just too karaoke.“


When Pineda finally came over from Manila, after months of Baruck’s lawyers trying to get a Visa, “he brought everybody presents and all of his Journey records, so he could at least get autographs if he didn’t make the band.”


To make sure Pineda was “the real deal,” Zelisko gave him “the treatment,” which included throwing punches and kicks at him, while he was singing in the studio.


“He didn’t miss a beat. We had to hire him.”


“Are you sick of any of the songs yet?” was one of the questions that came from the audience.


While Zelisko joked, “only the ones that don’t make money,” Baruck admitted: “I head to the dressing room from time to time to grab some snacks.“

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2018 1:25 am
by verslibre
steveo777 wrote:
verslibre wrote:
JourneyHard wrote:Promise a new album and then sit back and watch the fans go wild.


All 1758 of them. How the mighty have fallen. :lol:


I had those kinds of thoughts last time we took my sister to see Dave Mason/The Doobie brothers/Journey. The venue held 18,500 and when Mason opened, the place was less than 1/4 full. My sister was like, not many people here, is Journey still relevant? By the time The Doobies came on, it was about half full. Once Journey hit the stage, the place was full to the gills. So, out of that lineup, Journey was still the main attraction. Now an album, that might be a different story.


Your statement suggests half the audience was there to see the Doobies, the other half to see Journey. Considering the ticket price, the Doobie fans didn't leave because, well, they bought a ticket. :lol:

OTOH, NorCal obviously has a lot of old school Journey fans.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2018 1:29 am
by verslibre
The_Noble_Cause wrote:
verslibre wrote:
All 1758 of them. How the mighty have fallen. :lol:


Compared to what? Styx? Boston? Foreigner? All of their peers are pretty much in the same boat.


Boston should have hung up it ages ago. Journey should, too. And so should Yes. These guys are all embarrassing each other.

BOC I have more respect for because of their "fuck it, we're old, we're on tour forever" attitude. Don't expect new music from them. Their fan base goes to see them at casinos, fairs and small theaters, and they're good with it. Controversy isn't an element in their daily existence. Plus, they still have both their original lead vocalists, one of whom is their lead guitarist. And their music kicks ass.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2018 7:06 am
by brywool
Baruck was a DICK to Arnel after the Chile show. "I was livid"?? SCREW YOU, Baruck. Arnel Pineda just pulled YOUR ACT out of the frigging GRAVE and the people of Chile loved him AND Journey. You shoulda kissed his ass and you should be now. Wow, what a creep that guy is."He threatened to go home as he probably did after every day of the tour" - what a crappy thing to say about the guy that just saved your paycheck. Baruck should be grateful to Pineda because he still has a job and he shouldn't be airing things like that to the general public. Keep it between you, Arnel, and Journey. I knew I didn't like him before when I saw him do that on film, now that he's out there yacking about it makes me hate him more. "We don't do that" - BS. First of all "We"?? - you're a manager. You're not a performer. Steve Perry ALWAYS looked like a hyperactive kid out there and ran around everywhere. Just because Augeri was more sedate didn't mean Arnel had to be. If the manager wants to be the front guy, push his ass out on stage. Wow. Whatta jerk.

The comments about JSS using a device... I don't believe that in the least. You'd hear it. If there was some deception (there wasn't, obviously) - why would Baruck put that out there for public knowledge? That's obviously not something that anybody in the band would be happy for the public to know. Potentially damaging to JSS's reputation as well.

Man, if I was Neal, I would've been looking into a new manager immediately after that interview. This guy is someone that can't be trusted.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2018 10:46 pm
by The_Noble_Cause
verslibre wrote:
BOC I have more respect for because of their "fuck it, we're old, we're on tour forever" attitude. Don't expect new music from them. Their fan base goes to see them at casinos, fairs and small theaters, and they're good with it. Controversy isn't an element in their daily existence. Plus, they still have both their original lead vocalists, one of whom is their lead guitarist. And their music kicks ass.


While I like and respect BOC, they are not remotely in the same league as Journey or Foreigner. Additionally, BOC is on record saying they are going to release new music.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Fri May 18, 2018 1:34 am
by verslibre
The_Noble_Cause wrote:
verslibre wrote:
BOC I have more respect for because of their "fuck it, we're old, we're on tour forever" attitude. Don't expect new music from them. Their fan base goes to see them at casinos, fairs and small theaters, and they're good with it. Controversy isn't an element in their daily existence. Plus, they still have both their original lead vocalists, one of whom is their lead guitarist. And their music kicks ass.


While I like and respect BOC, they are not remotely in the same league as Journey or Foreigner. Additionally, BOC is on record saying they are going to release new music.


As far as album and concert ticket sales? No. But their thematic and musical repertoire is richer, and they have a boatload more albums than Journey, Boston and Foreigner to enjoy, too.

As for new music, I'll believe it when I see the title and album art. Their last one Curse of the Hidden Mirror kicks ass and contains one of my favorite BOC songs. They proved they still have it. But it's been a while now.

Re: Jonathan Cain's New Memoir: 10 Things We Learned

PostPosted: Fri May 18, 2018 7:03 am
by The_Noble_Cause
verslibre wrote:As far as album and concert ticket sales? No. But their thematic and musical repertoire is richer, and they have a boatload more albums than Journey, Boston and Foreigner to enjoy, too.


The topic was Journey doing a new album. Not thematic/musical repertoire.