Dennis DeYoung 26 East Volume 2 - REVIEWS

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Dennis DeYoung 26 East Volume 2 - REVIEWS

Postby SuiteMadameBlue » Tue Jul 27, 2021 5:06 am

There's a lot of reviews for Dennis DeYoung's 26 East Volume 2 :D

https://www.headbangerslifestyle.com/mu ... ast-vol-2/

June 9, 2021 by Edwin van Hoof -

`26 East, Vol 2’ is the follow up album to volume 1, which warped Dennis DeYoung back into the front seat of prog rock. The former Styx vocalist and songwriter shook his past and embarked onto a new journey together with Survivor’s Jim Peterik penning down a new range of classical DeYoung tunes. On par with his past, Dennis also injected modern ingredients as well as influences from his youth making the album flourish with energy. Displaying himself as a gifted charismatic vocalist, DeYoung took the helm and drove his album into a second volume packing the same charisma and energy.

"Hello Goodbye” immediately links to the over art of the new DeYoung album. The track musically tings effectively with Beatles riffs and orchestration, while lyrically it packs an enormous number of intended puns reverting back to McCartney’s and Lennon’s wordplay. Sound effects line up capturing the ingredients of the Liverpool four and Dennis and co-writer Jim Peterik manage to summarize many of the Beatles hits in only 4.25! Even the howl 3 minutes in fits the song’s profile. Thus Volume 2 of DeYoung’s 26 East record(s) lifts off with style. ,,Land Of The Living” is classic Styx/DeYoung-rooted and pulls forward with a wonderful classic drive. ,,The Last Guitar Hero” also packs this drive and energy, but is more progressively driven and features no tongue in cheek. Dennis addresses the industry and goes in full frontal. Dennis is also heralded for his intense ballads and the appealing lyrics. “Your Saving Grace” is a breathtaking gorgeous slow mover with dismantling emotional lyrics. It fuses “Babe” exclamation of love for his high school sweetheart and wife, reverting back in retrospective over his career and life. It is simply wonderful and widely appealing for romantics. It is that oozing warmth Dennis also injects in the power ballad ,,Made For Each Other” fusing the DeYoung keen melodies with pompous past elements and Beatles reminiscent structures and craft. It wells with glorious chorus and lyrics. The guitar solo is finger licking beautiful unloading in a short twin section. Topping it, Dennis fuses Beatles melodies with his personal trademark song writing in ,,Always Time”. The song is simply gorgeous. Powerful yet timid, slick yet unpredictable it hinges towards a gospel rather than rock, without breaking from DeYoung’s rocking roots. Highlights piling up, the slow movers are balanced by the rock tunes delivered and executed.

,,Proof Of Heaven” revives his heydays with the bands keenly fused with his classical musical past. It oozes tremendous pompous power and the multi-layered vocals in its chorus are astonishing. The combustion of the song is as dominant as on tracks from platinum selling ,,Paradise Theater” era. ,,Little Did We Know” also is deeply rooted in his classic past, with the song progressing in staccato steep pace. Throbbing and pulsating it beats towards a chanting and echoing chorus. Sheer magic is the acoustic progressed ,,There’s No Turning Back Time” leans strongly on the acoustic opening of Styx’ live cracker ,,Crystal Ball”. Pace and vocal melody are very similar but the song evolves differently. ,,St. Quarantine” unites Peterik’s Survivor-esque song writing with DeYoung’s typical vocal execution and song writing. Lyrically it is deeply rooted in the present: “So we wait on this new tomorrow, but be wise on who we follow…” before it goes all robotic and fusion chanting fist out ,,Wake up!”. DeYoung makes a statement without going on the slippery slope. ,,We hope this vaccine make this dream come true” resets the balance of his (somewhat) critical statements. It is what I dig in The Man! Dennis, with his decade long career behind his belt, doesn’t scare away from statements and vision. He puts it out there! ,,The Isle Of Misanthrope” opens with melancholic slow pace and DeYoung displaying his impressive pipes. Drenched in emotion he executes his lyrics with phenomenal feeling for drama and grace before the song goes all epic and progressive. Progressing with jazzy and movie score elements, the song also paws into more modern directions with sonic extravagant epic moments (Ten) adding lustre to the song. Its diversity and recognisability make it swirl. ,,Grand Finale” is the 1:55 short outro-like track that seems to summarize the album and bridges to Dennis’ acclaimed past with fragmental content from ,,Grand Illusion” and musical structures reminiscent to ,,Paradise Theater” and (less) ,,Cornerstone”.

Dennis instantly clears the board for an exciting dive into his mind and career. Excellent classic rock tracks and great lyrical content, with minor remarks to his past through tongue in cheek wordplay, make Volume 2 grow on you with every spin. Key ingredients are the impeccable melodic pompous drive fused with memorable melodies and choruses. Sir Dennis outclasses Volume 1 and on Volume 2 he broadens his horizon without overdoing. Revealing his love for The Beatles and his fine feeling for drama and emotion, DeYoung lands `East 26, Vol 2’ on this year’s melodic top ranks. Styx and DeYoung both land landmark melodic albums.
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Re: Dennis DeYoung 26 East Volume 2 - REVIEWS

Postby SuiteMadameBlue » Tue Jul 27, 2021 5:07 am

https://viriaor.wordpress.com/2021/06/0 ... ish-below/

In Roseland south of Chicago, more precisely in the basement of the house at 26 East was where Dennis DeYoung along with the brothers Chuck and John Panozzo began to take their first steps in the world of music, first under the name Tradewinds, then they were called TW4 to finally end up being called Styx, one of the most important bands that American rock gave in the decade of the 70s and 80s.

Dennis DeYoung had a discreet solo career achieving some commercial success with his first two albums “Desert Moon” (1984) and “Back To The World” (1986). But the most interesting came from the hand of “One Hundred Years From Now” of 2007 that marked in a way the return to his roots, recovering the spirit of Styx from his best years.

Last year, at the insistence of his friend Jim Peterik (Survivor, Pride of Lions), he began to welcome the idea of ​​recording new material and incidentally mark his farewell, at least from the recordings. So we had “26 East Vol.1” and as there was plenty of material the label decided to release it all, but in two parts.

With the introduction done, let’s go directly to what “26 East Vol.2” leaves us, which is an understandable musical continuation of its predecessor. The album begins with “Hello, Goodbye”. Attention, this is not a cover of The Beatles but it is a tribute, with a composition in the best style of the Fab Four (with the winds of The Ides of March) and also with several lyrical references. The Beatles are according to Dennis himself the maximum influence and inspiration of him.

“Land Of The Living” transports us to the melodic rock that I practice in “Edge of The Century”, the album that marked the return of Styx in the 90’s and moment in which they had to adapt to a musical era of which they were no longer part. In fact, at times the chorus is quite reminiscent of the song that gives that album its name. In a more modern rock line appears “The Last Guitar Hero”, a beautiful groove carries the song and even better, a memorable guitar solo by Tom Morello (Rage Againts The Machine, Audioslave) that helps to decorate the song giving it a beautiful turn of the screw.


Time to get mellow with “Your Saving Grace”, these ballads cannot be missing from any DDY album, we could say that “Lady” (Styx II from 1973) was his first love song, but his establishment as a “master of ballads” It was with the creation and consecration of “Babe” (Cornestone of 1979) moment where Styx exploded fully in all the FM of the world, being this his only song that reached the position N ° 1 in the charts. Here a gospel choir by Michael Manson makes its participation to round off an exquisite ballad. “Proof Of Heaven” already appeared on Jim Peterik and The World Stage’s album “Winds of Change” last year, since both share the signature of this composition that sounds like pure Styx was Pomp Rock, that is, glory itself.

And just as I mentioned that “Babe” gave it back to create ballads in soft rock / FM mode, songs like “Come Sail Away” or “The Best Of Time” affirmed it in those characteristic epic and pompous ballads, and here it leaves its own on “Made for Each Other” a perfect mix of the two hymns I mentioned earlier. To take his hat off with this 74-year-old man, not only because of what he composes but how he interprets it. One of the privileged few of his generation.

The appearance of acoustic guitars at the beginning of “There´s No Turning Back Time” leads us to “Crystal Ball”, sorry for the mentions of Styx but I cannot (and it is very clear that he does not want to) detach it from his beautiful past . and he personally celebrated it. “There’s No Turning Back Time” he stomps, with powerful backing vocals and his dramatic and personal voice that stands out at all times. A separate paragraph to the instrumental section when the song explodes, where all the symphonic artillery of the 70’s comes out.

Dennis DeYoung Details Farewell Album '26 East, Volume 2'
It doesn’t say so in the press release, but I could bet that the beginning of “St. Quarantine” where the melodic rock laden with voices shines was created by Jim Peterik and the change to rock n ‘blues has the DeYoung stamp, showing that it is encouraged to everything, although it was always the most elaborate and pompous side of Styx when it was his turn to rock, he left no doubts and here he shows it again.

“Little Did We Know” is closing your eyes and it looks like Tommy Shaw and James “JY” Young are doing backing vocals and playing those twin guitars. If they tell me it’s a re-recording of a song that was never recorded from the “Equinox” or “Pieces of Eight” era, I’ll believe it. It smells of the past, but it sounds very current. Undoubtedly one of the pearls of the album.

Piano and voice (and chorus) make “Always Time” a melancholic ballad that Alan Parsons for his Project would have recorded without thinking, as simple as it is effective. This piece prepares us for the epic “Isle Of Misanthrope”. He clearly had songs like “Suite Madame Blue” or “Clair de Lune / Ballerina” in mind, he also has hints of what he did in the rock opera “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” (1998), but the Styx Pomp / Art Rock DNA is very much present. Go to the promo video for the song where it secretly leaves many nods to Styx’s story.

The closing and goodbye as expected has to be full blast. Just as in volume 1 I adapt the closing of “Paradise Theater” with “AD 2020” on this occasion he re-recorded “Grand Finale” the track that closed “The Grand Illusion”, undoubtedly a suitable and very emotional ending. As a fact for the fan, his son Matthew DeYoung plays the drums in this song using the ride cymbal given by John himself, who according to the press release was his mentor.

Nothing more to add, it was what I expected and i can say that there is not a single second to spare on this album, which like the previous one is a caress to the heart of all Styx fans.

I don’t know how many musicians can afford to retire at 74 with clear ideas, compositional magic intact and in this case with a voice that continues to thrill as when he was in his twenties. Friends stand up and bow to say goodbye and thanks to Dennis DeYoung.

95%
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Re: Dennis DeYoung 26 East Volume 2 - REVIEWS

Postby SuiteMadameBlue » Tue Jul 27, 2021 5:09 am

 https://davematuro.medium.com/double-al ... 3c6775db41

Dennis DeYoung has released the second part of his final solo album duo, this one aptly titled “26 East, Volume 2”. DeYoung has stated this is his last record and he has decided to pay tribute to his biggest influences as well as his own musical career.
The album starts with “Hello Goodbye” which is a clear tribute to The Beatles. There are multiple vocal and musical odes to the band throughout the track which in itself sounds very much like a Beatles song.
“Land of the Living” is a much more modern sounding rock track. DeYoung still has that vocal range that made him such a star in the 80s.
“The Last Guitar Hero” features Tom Morello on guitar and takes on the decline of the rock business. “Gone like the record store and never coming back”. Morello gives us a typical Morello solo that fits the track well.
“Proof of Heaven” was on Jim Peterik’s last record that featured DeYoung. This sounds like the same version but is a really strong track. The combination of Survivor and Styx produces an anthemic treat.
“There’s No Turning Back Time” is one of multiple reflective tracks. It’s clear this is DeYoung’s swan song which can border on melancholy at times. At the halfway point the track takes a turn and sounds like old school Styx which really works.
“St. Quarantine” has a Springsteen-like sound to it which I just love. It’s a really smart take and turn on the pandemic in classic Springsteen style.
“Always Time” is another melancholy look back and the passage of time. It’s both beautiful and haunting.
“Isle of Misanthrope” brings me back to the early days of listening to Styx. It’s a six minute epic that sounds almost medieval at the start but then switches gears to a classic sounding early Styx track before a quick return to the medieval feel from the start. It breaks up the reflective feel that the end of the record has which makes me wonder if it wouldn’t have been a better fit earlier in the sequencing.
The album ends with “Grand Finale” which is a quick ode to DeYoung’s career and especially to the songs “Come Sail Away” and “Grand Illusion”, to the point of revisiting a part of the latter song. It’s a fitting final bow as DeYoung exits the stage.
This is what I would want from a final record from DeYoung. He opens by paying tribute to his biggest influence and closes with a nod to his most famous and influential moments as an artist with some quality material in between that is at times critical, melancholy and reflective.
My hope is DeYoung continues on in some capacity and of course I’d love to see the classic lineup of Styx reunite one more time. But if this is the end for DeYoung then he has left well.
Thanks for the music, DD.
90 out of 100
Track Listing
1. Hello Goodbye
2. Land of the Living *
3. The Last Guitar Hero
4. Your Saving Grace
5. Proof of Heaven *
6. Made for Each Other
7. There’s No Turning Back Time *
8. St. Quarantine *
9. So Little Did We Know
10. Always Time
11. Isle of Misanthrope *
12. Grand Finale *
*Best Songs
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Re: Dennis DeYoung 26 East Volume 2 - REVIEWS

Postby SuiteMadameBlue » Tue Jul 27, 2021 5:10 am

 https://519magazine.com/cd-review-denni ... ast-vol-2/

Former Styx frontman Dennis DeYoung is back with the second volume of his fond farewell to recorded music, “26 East, Vol. 2.” As with the preceding volume, “26 East, Vol. 2” once again hints strongly at DeYoung’s rock roots with Styx and it doesn’t get any better than this. For fans, it’s the second part of the epic music they’ve been wanting for years.

The album stands up with the best of the best of Styx – the Crystal Ball’s, The Grand Illusion’s, the Paradise Theatre’s. It’s a master perfecting his craft and ending it all on a high note.

There isn’t one song on either of these two volumes that wouldn’t fit in a classic Styx show. Even the title of the collection is a tip of the hat to Styx history: “26 East” was the address where DeYoung grew up in Roseland, IL on the far south side of Chicago. This is where the band was formed in his basement in 1962. Across the street lived the Panozzo twins, John and Chuck, who along with DeYoung would go on to form the nucleus of Styx.

The album even ends with The Grand Finale, a touching performance of the epilogue masterpiece from The Grand Illusion – a fitting farewell to a rock and roll legend.

The Last Guitar Hero is a great lead single at the album’s release and has the power and pop sensibility to be a hit, should rock radio choose to play it. It captures the essence of the decline of the rock music, performed with a passion by one of rock’s legacy heroes.

The song Proof of Heaven has been with us for a while – its music video was released back in March of 2019. It’s a pretty uplifting and positive piece with heavy religious undertones and an optimistic outlook. This is the type of material fans deeply love from their former Styx lead singer – songs that are very theatrical and powerful.

The lovely Made For Each Other is a great DeYoung ballad and Isle of Misanthrope is in the true epic style of classics like Castle Walls or Suite Madame Blue One of the odd Styx tributes on the album is the upbeat acoustic rocker There’s No Turning Back Time, which sounds a little too much like Crystal Ball.

The addition of Jim Peterik on the new music is a huge welcome. The Survivor vocalist compliments DeYoung in the same way Tommy Shaw and James JY Young did when Styx was at its original peak. Too bad they didn’t work with each other decades ago.

The recording genius of Dennis DeYoung will be sadly missed, but both volumes of 26 East are an incredible closure.
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Re: Dennis DeYoung 26 East Volume 2 - REVIEWS

Postby SuiteMadameBlue » Tue Jul 27, 2021 5:12 am

http://newwaveofbritishheavymetal.com/dennis-de-young-26-east-vol-2-review

Dennis De Young 26 East Vol 2 Review
By | Published June 13, 2021


Dennis De Young 26 East Vol 2 Dennis De Young, long-time member of Styx in their heyday of course, puts out what is said to be his final album with 26 East Vol 2.

After so long in the business at in his mid-70s, Dennis remains at the top of his craft and his voice is as powerful, rangy and clear as ever.

All the elements which made Styx so great in the 1970s/early 1980s are here too – power, pomp, prog, ballads, sweeping theatrics, hooks and melodies galore and clever lyrics with everything performed to perfection.

Hello Goodbye starts things off. An excellent melodic affair playing homage to a band you may remember comprising of four blokes from Liverpool.

So well done and one gets the feeling this is Dennis going back to where here got the bug to get in to the music biz himself.

Land of the Living an expansive melodic rocker full of those hooks and melodies in typical De Young style with a nice chunky feel to it.

Next up is the glorious Last Guitar Hero. A monstrous heavy song with yet more of those trademark harmonies (it would have sat very well on the Grand Illusion or Crystal Ball) as the lyrics lament the passing of our guitar heroes as technology surpasses natural ability. Check out the lyrics in the video – and the superb solo too.

Proof of Heaven is another expertly written and arranged sweeping affair with an epic feel. Then we move on to There’s No Turning Back Time. Poignant lyrics, slow burning and brooding before it breaks out in to proper pomp territory and a glorious short synth solo. Not unlike say Suite Madame Blue.

St. Quarantine is what I’ll call “topical” given what’s been going in in the world this past eighteen months or so (the clue being in the title) with more on-point lyrics and more De Young pompness giving way to a somewhat funky second half of the song. Works so well.

There are a couple of (in my opinion) far too sugary-sweet ballads along the way. Not my bag hence I’ll skip over them however you can’t deny that Dennis is adept at such songs.

Anyhoo – the big, big finish. Isle of Misanthrope. A proper pomp-prog epic all the way up to eleven. It’s all going on. The sort of gentle opening passages (a bit like Crystal Ball) then it kicks off in some style with the big guitars, big chunky riffs, keys, towering vocals – the whole nine yards.

The little lead-out is the Grand Finale. If you’re familiar with Styx classic Grand Illusion you’ll get what Dennis has done here. A nice closing touch.

If this is indeed to be a farewell album from Dennis, it’s a glorious swansong from a consummate performer.

Get your ears around Dennis’s album and hear how classic pomp/rock should be done. Available in all the usual various formats



Read more http://newwaveofbritishheavymetal.com/d ... l-2-review
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Re: Dennis DeYoung 26 East Volume 2 - REVIEWS

Postby SuiteMadameBlue » Tue Jul 27, 2021 5:13 am

https://www.rockandbluesmuse.com/2021/0 ... -east-vol-

Review: Dennis DeYoung ’26 East Vol 2′


By Mike O’Cull

Dennis DeYoung, the former frontman of multi-platinum classic rock band Styx, has returned to his fans one final time with 26 East: Volume 2, the second part of his long goodbye to recording new music. Released June 11th, 2021 on Frontiers Music, the set is named after DeYoung’s childhood street address in Chicago’s far South Side Roseland neighborhood. The first 26 East record was intended to be the end point of DeYoung’s long and distinguished recording career but he had written so many good songs for the project that all involved felt a second effort was in order. Dennis collaborated on the albums with longtime friend, fellow Chicago guy, and “Eye Of The Tiger” tunesmith Jim Peterik, who told him that the world needed his music. Guitarist and activist Tom Morello (Rage Against The Machine, Audioslave) also appears. The record is another amazing helping of DeYoung’s instantly-recognizable sound and clearly demonstrates just how big a part of Styx’s success he was.

Dennis DeYoung needs little introduction to most rock fans. He was the driving creative force behind Styx, writing and singing all but one of the band’s Top Ten hit songs. He’s a dynamic and dramatic vocalist, an outstanding keyboardist, and the composer of rock radio staples like “Lady,” “Come Sail Away,” “Babe,” “The Best Of Times,” and “Mr. Roboto.” His style mixes enormous pop hooks with vintage rock DNA and a lot more prog than he and Styx often get credit for. He and Styx were incredibly successful in the 70s and 80s, getting major radio play, selling out arenas, and releasing the multi-platinum albums The Grand Illusion (1977), Pieces of Eight (1978), Cornerstone (1979), and Paradise Theatre (1981).

DeYoung gets his party underway with “Hello Goodbye,” a highly melodic pop/rock excursion about The Beatles and their influence on his generation. It’s a pulsating, orchestrally-minded piece that’s 100% vintage DDY. DeYoung’s voice is still clear and strong and he’s not going out having lost a step or two like many older rock singers have. “Land Of The Living” is a straight-ahead rocker with an abundance of crunchy guitars, pumping bass, and cool vocal harmonies. The entire band is tight, crisp, and made up of Chicago’s best, including Peterik on bass, guitar, and backing vocals, Ed Breckenfeld on drums, and Mike Aquino on guitar. It’s a wonderful track that will sound great blasting out of your car speakers all summer.

“The Last Guitar Hero” is an unapologetic hard rock track that harkens back to Pieces of Eight-era Styx that takes on the topic of guitar music’s diminished place in mainstream music and the trap of technology. Tom Morello drops his typically experimental guitar work into the mix, which is a happy occurrence that gives the song a sharp edge. It’s as close to a protest song as DeYoung has ever done and he punches hard, singing that great rock guitarists are “gone like a record store and never coming back.” It’s a major moment of backbone pushback from someone who conquered the record business back when talent mattered. DeYoung deserves respect for speaking his truth and calling it like he sees it.

Nobody rocked a power ballad like Styx back in the day and the epically romantic “Made For Each Other” proves that Dennis hasn’t lost his golden touch on this kind of material. He had a sincerity with these songs few can match and it’s always been a central part of his writing style. A great many of us slow-danced to DeYoung’s ballads at homecoming in the 70s and 80s and “Made For Each Other” is as good as any of them. Other deep cuts worth your listening time include “St. Quarantine,” the progged-out “Isle Of Misanthrope,” and the majestic “Grand Finale” that ends the record. It’s a reprise of the Styx track “Grand Illusion” and makes a fitting and emotional final moment of DeYoung’s recording career. 26 East: Volume 2 is a sublime record from one of the best Chicago has ever produced. If you ever loved Styx, you owe it to yourself to hear how DeYoung has chosen to finish.
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Re: Dennis DeYoung 26 East Volume 2 - REVIEWS

Postby SuiteMadameBlue » Tue Jul 27, 2021 5:15 am

https://outsiderrock.wordpress.com/2021 ... ast-vol-2/

DENNIS DEYOUNG – 26 EAST VOL 2
MAY 26, 2021 KJ 4 COMMENTS

In what is to be Dennis DeYoung’s final album – 26 East Vol 2 will not disappoint DeYoung or so those old Styx fans who still miss him as part of the band. Assuming Dennis is at peace with this being his last, one can’t help but feel a bit sad for him, having created such a fantastic repertoire of music for fans, and here it is – the Grand Finale! And a bit sad [regardless of what you think of his departure from Styx], that he ends his career not as part of the legendary band he helped create and lead for many years. Although I have not picked up everything Dennis did outside of Styx, the guy’s music holds a place for me as one of my first favorite bands whom I collected right til they split in the ’80s, and who’s lyrics usually meant something . I hope the guy has a book in his retirement plans! Having said all that, I enjoyed 26 East Vol 1 last year, but I think I just may enjoy this one a good bit more. At first I thought the cover was a bit odd, a throw back to the ’60s, but really it’s a nod to Meet The Beatles! There is plenty of reflecting in this diverse batch of tunes, and a few nods to his past with Styx, and plenty of those old Styx harmonies. The album opens with “Hello Goodbye”, and it’s a Beatles’ inspired upbeat pop number, complete with horns, and plenty of Beatles references. Sure there’s a few ballads, most notably “Your Saving Grace” and “Always Time”, which would have fit well on a classic Styx album.


Actually there are a few tracks here that wouldn’t be out of place on a Styx album, and thus will appeal greatly to those fans, like “Proof Of Heaven” which – with those harmonies and chorus remind me of the track “Pieces Of Eight”, and of course “The Isle Of Misanthrope” sees DeYoung return to those progressive Styx cuts. “There’s No Turning Back Time” is an early favorite here, starting as a ballad and going through a few changes and picking up the pace when the band kicks in, and lyrically one of a number of songs here that just may bring out an emotional reaction to those fans of DeYoung’s writing.

Aside from the opening track there is some catchy upbeat stuff, such as “Land Of The Living” [this would’ve made a fine single at one point], and the rock track “The Last Guitar Hero” [with Tom Morello of Rage Against The Machine], a song citing rock being dead due to technology, a great tune. The album ends with a revisit of “The Grand Finale”, so wonderfully put on here, as it caps off more than just another album.


Such a great set of songs, varied, touching on everything DeYoung was best known for in Styx. Fans will appreciate it, as he kinda returns home [minus the band] on this album. Very much looking forward to getting the gatefold vinyl LP, opening it up. putting it on the record player, and enjoying it as I did with those old Styx albums decades ago.

RELEASE DATE: June 11, 2021

Former Styx frontman Dennis DeYoung is back with the second volume of his fond farewell to recorded music, “26 East, Vol. 2.” As with the preceding volume, “26 East, Vol. 2” once again hints strongly at DeYoung’s rock roots with Styx. The production and musicianship are EPIC, and those timeless vocal arrangements get delivered in spades. A fitting goodbye and a final signature on an outstanding body of work which will stand the test of time!

DeYoung has previously stated that “26 East” will mark his retirement from the world of recorded music. It was thanks to Frontiers CEO, Serafino Perugino, that given the abundance of material, Dennis agreed to split the album in two parts. This second half starts where the previous one left off and sees DeYoung collaborate again with the awesome Jim Peterik, a fellow Chicagoan and nearby neighbor, for the songwriting on select tracks.

“The last album was supposed to be my final album, but there were so many songs written that Serafino Perugino, CEO of Frontiers, suggested dividing it into two albums rather than one,” DeYoung states.

“26 East” was the address where DeYoung grew up in Roseland, IL on the far south side of Chicago. This is where the band was formed in his basement in 1962. Across the street lived the Panozzo twins, John and Chuck, who along with DeYoung would go on to form the nucleus of Styx.

The process that brought forth the album beginning in the first place started when Jim Peterik, a fellow Chicagoan and nearby neighbor, sent a song to Dennis.

“If not for Jim Peterik’s encouragement, talent and prodding I would not have recorded this music,” says DeYoung. “He once told me the world needed my music; to which I replied ‘have the world text me for verification.’ We collaborated from the get go, happily and seamlessly and at this time we have written 9 songs together of which five will be on Volume 1. Just two Chicago guys doing what they do best, making music and having a laugh.”

https://www.facebook.com/DennisDeYoungOfficial
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVGASb ... yOxn2GVLQQ
http://www.dennisdeyoung.com/

Tracklist:
Hello Goodbye
Land Of The Living
The Last Guitar Hero (Featuring Tom Morello)
Your Saving Grace
Proof Of Heaven
Made For Each Other
There’s No Turning Back Time
St. Quarantine
Little Did We Know
Always Time
The Isle Of Misanthrope
Grand Finale

Line-up:
Vocals: Dennis DeYoung
Drums: Mike Morales, Ed Breckenfeld, Matthew DeYoung & The Late Khari Parker
Guitar: Jim Peterik, Mike Aquino, August Zadra, Jim Leahey
Solo on Last Guitar Hero: Tom Morello “The Great Houdini”
Bass: Jim Peterik, Jim Majors, Me on Synth Bass.
Keyboards: Me & Why Not?
Horns on Hello Goodbye, The Ides Of March: Tim Bales, Steve Eisen & Henry Delgado
Accordion: Mr.Tacit
Background Vocals: Jim Peterik, August Zadra, Kevin Chalfant, Suzanne Deyoung, Tito Gobi, Craig Carter, Mike Morales & Me. Mostly Me, I Work Cheap And Was Always Available. Besides My Voice Always Reminds People Of A Very Popular ’70s And ’80s Group. No, Not The Pointer Sisters.
Michael Manson Gospel Group on Your Saving Grace
Matthew DeYoung would like to dedicate his performance on the Grand Finale to his mentor John Panozzo. The ride cymbal Matthew used was given to him by John.

Links:

Dennis DeYoung – 26 East Vol. 2 – YouTube

Dennis DeYoung (Formerly of Styx) – “Meaning of Misanthrope” – Breakdown of the Song and Music Video – YouTube

The Official Dennis DeYoung Web Site

26 East, Vol. 2: Dennis Deyoung: Amazon.ca: Music

DENNIS DE YOUNG – 26East: Volume 2 – Ltd. Gatefold BLACK Vinyl | Frontiers Music Official Shop
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Re: Dennis DeYoung 26 East Volume 2 - REVIEWS

Postby SuiteMadameBlue » Tue Jul 27, 2021 5:17 am

https://www.velvetthunder.co.uk/dennis- ... ers-music/

DENNIS DEYOUNG – 26 EAST: VOLUME 2 (FRONTIERS MUSIC)
VELVET THUNDER > REVIEWS > DENNIS DEYOUNG – 26 EAST: VOLUME 2 (FRONTIERS MUSIC)

June 11, 2021 Reviews
So, this is it, the (supposed) final ever studio release by the golden voiced Dennis DeYoung, a truly awful fact to have to take in especially when the voice of DeYoung and the music of Styx has been an integral part of your life. It didn’t seem quite real when it was announced that he would be concluding his career with 26 East which was being split into two releases with Volume One coming out last year and Volume Two in 2021 but here we are and we have to accept it but, as we have seen so many times before, many artists have backtracked on end of career announcements so there is always hope. Maybe even one last Hurrah with Styx???


This is not the time to review the career of Dennis DeYoung as everyone reading this will already know of his activities with Styx, the acrimonious split and his subsequent solo life since finally leaving the band in 1999. Suffice it to say that he is a global superstar, singing sensation, musician and song writer and it is also no secret that DeYoung was moving into a more commercial environment with his song writing and his love of the Broadway has always been evident. If in doubt simply check out 10 On Broadway which shows he has the vocal talents to star on the West End and Broadway very easily. This, of course, doesn’t mean that he abandoned his rock roots and he can still rock with the best of them today; it’s just that he seems to prefer the more melodic and mellower side of music.

When DeYoung announced his retirement from the recording industry he planned just the one final album but he hit a prolific stream of writing and thus the decision was made to make this a two CD affair split over a year and it is quite true that the best things in life are always worth waiting for. As was quite heavily publicised on Volume One, 26 East is the address where DeYoung grew up in Roseland in Chicago and where the foundations that became Styx were laid in his basement in 1962 and that is truly a frightening thought. Both albums are something of rites of passage for DeYoung as they, more or less, chart his career path and so we get any number of Styx type pomp rock masterpieces mixed in with typical, trademark DeYoung ballads and the odd show tune themed song and all still retain the capacity to thrill to the core. You will hear many musical similarities to past glories and this is quite deliberate as we travel the road with him and it is fun to pick out which songs he references with whole passages here and simple, more fleeting glimpses there.

Throughout there is an over-arching Beatles theme with the opening track Hello Goodbye being a wonderful homage to the Fab Four, great stuff and the Beatles influences are no surprise given that they were very instrumental in shaping his career and he has absorbed so many other influences over the years too which have helped to make him the master songwriter that he is. As with Volume One, Jim Peterik (Survivor/Pride Of Lions) was again heavily involved in the project in writing some of the songs with DeYoung and on guitar. The talent list of musicians involved is equally impressive many of whom appeared on Volume One too and can be found at the end of the review and was obviously written by DeYoung based on some of the amusing comments that have been made. It’s a pleasure listening to the lyrics as DeYoung tells his stories and, of course, there just has to be a song which refers to the crazy year that we have all had to endure as well as references to the music industry, the planet, basically you name it and he has covered it. There is the odd moment of melancholy for times that have melted into history but this really is a life affirming album from man who is still at the top of his game and his voice remains as beautiful and perfect as ever. Each of the 12 songs shows a different side of De Young and it is evident that Styx blood still runs very deep in his veins as he manages to blend the sounds of the theatre, pomp rock and lush ballad seamlessly and perfectly. Both volumes are essential and will stand as great testimony to a true star of our generation, any doubt about that then listen to The Isle Of The Misanthrope and tell me that this man has not been touched by genius!

If this is the end then Dennis DeYoung has bowed out in triumph and we will truly not see his like again. However, the clamour for more starts now. By the way, I just love the 60’s retro album cover.


26 East Vol 2 track list

Hello Goodbye (4:26)
Land Of The Living (3:44)
The Last Guitar Hero (Featuring Tom Morello) (4:47)
Your Saving Grace (3:36)
Proof Of Heaven (5:28)
Made For Each Other 4:03)
There’s No Turning Back Time (4:47)
St. Quarantine (5:00)
Little Did We Know (4:17)
Always Time (4:07)
The Isle Of Misanthrope (6:07)
Grand Finale (1:59)

Line-up:
Vocals: Dennis DeYoung
Drums: Mike Morales, Ed Breckenfeld, Matthew DeYoung & The Late Khari Parker
Guitar: Jim Peterik, Mike Aquino, August Zadra, Jim Leahey
Solo on Last Guitar Hero: Tom Morello “The Great Houdini”
Bass: Jim Peterik, Jim Majors, Me on Synth Bass.
Keyboards: Me & Why Not?
Horns on Hello Goodbye, The Ides Of March: Tim Bales, Steve Eisen & Henry Delgado
Accordion: Mr.Tacit
Background Vocals: Jim Peterik, August Zadra, Kevin Chalfant, Suzanne Deyoung, Tito Gobi, Craig Carter, Mike Morales & Me. Mostly Me, I Work Cheap And Was Always Available. Besides My Voice Always Reminds People Of A Very Popular ’70s And ’80s Group. No, Not The Pointer Sisters.
Michael Manson Gospel Group on Your Saving Grace
Matthew DeYoung would like to dedicate his performance on the Grand Finale to his mentor John Panozzo. The ride cymbal Matthew used was given to him by John.
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Re: Dennis DeYoung 26 East Volume 2 - REVIEWS

Postby SuiteMadameBlue » Tue Jul 27, 2021 5:19 am

https://dangerdog.com/2021-music-review ... Nt5rxA8Lmo

DENNIS DEYOUNG: 26 EAST VOL. 2
Dennis DeYoung - 26 East Vol. 2 Album Art
Dennis DeYoung: 26 East Vol. 2
AOR Melodic Rock
5.0/5.0
Internet
Frontiers Music
Words: Craig Hartranft
Added: 09.06.2021 | Released: 11.06.2021

Last year, in the midst of a global pandemic, we saw the release of Dennis DeYoung's 26 East Vol. 1, an album that was to be his swan song of last recordings. Except until he discovered that he had a whole bunch more songs to offer from a lifetime of musical creativity. The folks at Frontiers Music's suggested dropping two albums to mark the end of his recording career, wherein 26 East Vol. 2 hits the stores. (But I have the gut feeling that this may not be the end.)

This volume succeeds where the first one left off. DeYoung offers his fans more AOR melodic hard rock infused with his smooth vocals and immense harmonious vocal arrangements, synth symphonic embellishment, wonderful guitar solos, a dash of horns, with all things wrapped up in fashionable song melody and catchy refrains. And, yes, the Styx element and influence remains, but we all know that. Also, longtime friend and fellow Chicagoan Jim Peterik returns to assist in songwriting, but also play bass and guitar. Tom Morello of Rage Against The Machine fame appears to add a guitar solo to The Last Guitar Hero.

Other acts of musical brilliance arrive with the up beat and popish Hello Goodbye and St Quarantine, though the latter is a bit heavier. But that's to say that DeYoung and friends can still rock out, as with Land Of The Living and The Last Guitar Hero. Softer, ballad-like, material comes with Made For Each Other and There's No Turning Back. Then there were my two favorites: Your Saving Grace and Proof Of Heaven. Perhaps two inspirational, even Gospel-inspired numbers, at least maybe the former? The album concludes, appropriately, with the Styx tune, Grand Finale from The Grand Illusion. All said, if 26 East Vols. 1 & 2 are Dennis DeYoung's parting musical recordings, then they are fine ones. His status as a distinguished AOR melodic rock songwriter and musician are easily now legendary. Quite recommended.
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Re: Dennis DeYoung 26 East Volume 2 - REVIEWS

Postby SuiteMadameBlue » Tue Jul 27, 2021 5:22 am

http://spillmagazine.com/spill-album-re ... -volume-2/

SPILL ALBUM REVIEW: DENNIS DEYOUNG – 26 EAST, VOLUME 2
Dennis DeYoung
DENNIS DEYOUNG
26 EAST, VOLUME 2
FRONTIERS MUSIC

Last year Dennis DeYoung released the album 26 East: Vol. 1 which was originally to be his farewell to the music world. He recorded so much music that he was encouraged to split the project into several albums, which he did, thus we have 26 East: Volume 2. It is is very much a continuation of 26 East, Vol. 1, as it should be. Once again, the former lead singer of Styx enlists some friends, including Rage Against The Machine’s Tom Morello, Survivor’s Jim Peterik and Tim Bales of The Ides of March. The end result is a slick, well-produced album full of ‘classic rock’ sounding songs. For the record, 26 East is the address in which DeYoung grew up in Roseland, Illinois. It was here that Styx formed and he received his musical education.

In saying goodbye, DeYoung wanted to pay respect and acknowledge his influences and his history with Styx. One look at the album sleeve, one knows he was is a huge Beatles fan and the band has had a huge impact on him. He pays homage to Meet The Beatles with the cover design. Musically, this is summed up beautifully in the very Beatley opening track “Hello Goodbye”, which is not a cover but very close. He cleverly weaves familiar melodies into his tribute to the Fab Four and it is not only effective, but is a wonderful way to open the album. The song is heartfelt and one of the finest tributes to The Beatles available.

From there, he taps into the world of Styx, from the hard-rocking songs, such as “The Last Guitar Hero” featuring Morello, to the power ballads for which Styx became synonymous including the beautiful “Proof Of Heaven”, “Made For Each Other” and “Always Time”, which sounds like the sequel to “Babe”. The album is a nice balance of rock and ballads, but it becomes somewhat predictable, which is the only downfall of the album.

DeYoung himself sounds fantastic. His voice has not changed over the years and it is as strong today as it was when the band debuted in 1972. And it is nice to hear him on keyboards. He has never received enough credit for his musical abilities, and this album clearly demonstrates how strong of a player he is. He even returns to the accordion (an instrument he initially played when forming his first band in 1961).

The biggest, and most pleasant surprise on the album is the wonderful, and my favourite track on the album, “The Isle Of Misanthrope”. This is a prog rock journey that is quite remarkable. DeYoung sings a warning of where the world is heading and with that message and the build-up, he has come up with a song that should become a classic. This song leads into a brilliant ending called “Grand Finale”, which of course taps into “The Grand Illusion” and is actually very moving. Knowing that this is his final album, hearing this song brought a tear to my eye. It is also dedicated to the late John Panozzo, the original Styx drummer. A very suitable and moving end to the album.

All in all, it is a very emotional and strong album to bring a musical career to a conclusion. 26 East: Volume 2, as with Volume 1, the Styx album that fans have been wishing for for years. It holds up to any Styx album and, no doubt will and should be embraced by fans.
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Re: Dennis DeYoung 26 East Volume 2 - REVIEWS

Postby SuiteMadameBlue » Tue Jul 27, 2021 5:24 am

http://www.fabricationshq.com/dennis-de ... vol-2.html

Dennis DeYoung – 26 East Vol 2

There was more than a touch of poignancy and autobiographical reflection on Dennis DeYoung’s previous album 26 East Vol 1, bolstered by some fine song writing and collaboration between DeYoung and his Chicago neighbour Jim Peterik, who encouraged DeYoung to get back in the studio for one more solo work hurrah.

Indeed such was their collaborative dovetailing the pair completed a song Peterik brought to DeYoung's table before rattling off another eight songs together, five of which appeared on Vol 1.
With the creative juices flowing again and a number of DeYoung-Peterik songs still unused, a companion album/ sequel became inevitable.

The second and final instalment of 26 East is equally poignant and even more reflective in nature, accompanied by an ensemble of around a dozen musicians and backing singers (although DeYoung’s vocal is prominent both fore and aft), each of whom contribute to what is seemingly the final studio album from the man who was once the directional heart (and for many the missing soul) of Styx.

If you think the opening bars of 'Hello Goodbye' has such a distinctly Beatles in the mid-60s sound that it must be a homage or pastiche you’d be spot on – that homage continues across the entire four-and-a-half minutes of the number as Dennis DeYoung musically & lyrically pulls out every Fab Four reference (and obligatory "yeah!" and "ooh!" or five) and song-title trick in the Beatles book.
In short, a fun song of thanks to "four lads" that made such an impacting and lasting impression on the US in 1964 and every budding and wannabee American musician, including a then 17 year old Dennis DeYoung.

'Land of the Living' encapsulates and presents that heavy pop-rockin' style that Dennis DeYoung does so well, here featuring a lyric of re-energised faith in oneself and, one suspects, in music.

The similarly weighted 'Last Guitar Hero' is, as the title suggests, about a dying musical breed in the face of 21st streaming technology and corporate greed, while featured guitarist Tom Morello delivers blistering solo lines that are intentionally over-treated and overplayed to make their six-string point...

It wouldn’t be a Dennis DeYoung album without a ballad or three (and that’s exactly how many you get).
First up to the plate is 'Your Saving Grace,' which features the Michael Manson Gospel Choir vocally enhancing a number that, musically, comes across as 'Babe' meets off-Broadway musical.

That music theatre style (a Dennis DeYoung love) is even more prominent on the lyrically questioning 'Proof Of Heaven,' which also manages to carry an element of Jon Anderson meets classic era Styx across its broader scoped five-and-a-half minutes.

'Made For Each Other' (featuring a guitar solo so Brian May in sound and style Mr May might well be checking his audio archives to see if it’s one of his) is the love song of the album (again, it wouldn’t be a Dennis DeYoung album without one).
Following number, 'There’s No Turning Back Time,' then slow builds to become a lyrically reflective, light-rock look to the past (while acknowledging the past is just that).

'St. Quarantine' brings us very much back to the present (pandemic) times via a cleverly constructed, two-songs-in-one number (pomp rock opening, funkier blues finish) before 'Little Did We Know' returns to the tried and tested Dennis DeYoung style of theatrical rock.

'Always Time' is gentle and quintessential Dennis DeYoung balladeering.
Some may find the song syrupy but it is, in truth, a slightly ethereal, delicate and deeply poignant waltz-styled number that lyrically reasons while it may seem as if we "always have time," that time is, by nature, always running out.

The Best of DeYoung Times is saved for last via anthemic six minute number 'Isle of Misanthrope' and the two minute Styx closer, 'Grand Finale.'

The former is a Suite Madame Blues for the planet, building from an opening that intentionally reflects that classic Styx number to a Grand Illusion of musical pomp and lyrical circumstance that predicts a not so bright outcome (a commentary, as Dennis DeYoung stated in pre-release press, on "the confounding nature of mankind under the guise of ancient times").
Yet the song carries a glimmer of song ending hope by way of a possible space-faring future, where we "sailed away" (nice touch Dennis) on a course set for better days.

The faithful revisit of The Grand Illusion’s 'Grand Finale' is a fitting ending to both 26 East Vol 2 and Dennis DeYoung’s recording career – made all the more poignant by DeYoung’s son Matthew DeYoung featuring on drums and signing off on the ride cymbal given to him by John Panozzo many years ago.

"And deep inside we’re all the same."
Amen to that Brother Dennis and thanks for the last 50 years; from those earliest Styx/ Wooden Nickel label recordings to your Grand studio Finale, it’s been a musical pleasure.

Ross Muir
FabricationsHQ
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Re: Dennis DeYoung 26 East Volume 2 - REVIEWS

Postby SuiteMadameBlue » Tue Jul 27, 2021 5:25 am

https://progressiverockcentral.com/2021 ... -volume-2/

Dennis DeYoung – “26 East Volume 2”
Professor Mark June 20, 2021

Dennis DeYoung is back with his second and final solo album, 26 East Volume 2, which was released June 11, 2021. I was fortunate enough to receive the first volume and played it often last year. That album was a lot of fun to review and listen to regularly.

26 East Volume 2 is not as spectacular as the first volume, but it does contain the best song on either volume, mainly “Isle of Misanthrope”; this album’s first single. It is a tribute to his work with Styx, and a perfect commentary on the state of the USA, at the same time. More on this later.


Most of the album is a celebration of life, DeYoung’s relationship with his wife and his wave goodbye to recording.

The album opens with a tribute to the Beatles – “Hello Goodbye”. DeYoung insists “It’s not a cover of the famous Beatle’s song. DeYoung stated, “I read an article about Pink Floyd recording at Abbey Road the same time as the Beatles. They met the lads and told them that there would be no Floyd without them. Yet Floyd‘s music is nothing like the Beatles and neither was Styx’s. “’Hello Goodbye”, as I have previously mentioned is not a remake, it’s a tribute to the lads who sent me down this long and winding road that led me to youse guys.”


“Land of the Living”, is not a cover of the classic Don Henley song either, it just shares the same name. This version is a happy tribute to his wife. DeYoung sings, “There is a seismic shift and a powerful lift in the atmosphere. And the whole world rocks whenever you’re near”. His wife restored his faith, as most wives do, for their husbands. A great tribute.

“The Last Guitar Hero”, is a great rocker, full of, you guessed it – guitar. A tribute to guitar players all over the world. Despite the many new talented guitarists out there, De Young states, “Bits and bytes have taken over – gone like a dinosaur, and never comin’ back”. Tom Morello, (Rage Against The Machine, and Audioslave), plays a great solo and helps you forget what DeYoung’s singing.

“Your Saving Grace”, is a wonderful song of redemption and faith.

“Proof of Heaven”, is another wonderful embrace of faith, set to some Styx harmonies and chords.

“Made for Each Other”, is a wonderful ballad to De Young’s wife, Suzanne Feusi. The couple recently celebrated their 51st wedding anniversary.

“There’s No Turning Back Time”, (opening sounds like Crystal Ball), and “So Little Did We Know”, are all wonderful ballads with some elements of Styx nostalgia interspersed.


“Always Time”, is another of the stand-out hits from this record. That opening melody is so familiar. But DeYoung takes it over and drives it back to its purpose. Its DeYoung’s “Imagine”. A wonderful and dreamy song that could bring a tear to your eye. A very Grand Illusion/Crystal Ball kind of song.

The diamond on this album is the ride back on the ship of nostalgia that is “Isle of Misanthrope”. It is a glorious return to Equinox and The Grand Illusion. DeYoung states, “When people ask “What is “Isle of Misanthrope” about?”, I reply “About eight minutes,” quips DeYoung. “Not to be too cute, but the lyrics are a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma. Wait, that was Winston Churchill’s statement about the Soviet Union. Sorry. ‘Misanthrope’, metaphorically speaking (ooooh look, big words) is a commentary on the contemporary state of mankind under the guise of ancient times. The more things change the more they remain the same. Also, ‘Isle of Misanthrope’ is my musical journey back to the days of Styx’s Equinox and “Suite Madame Blue”, as I attempt to explain the exasperating and confounding nature of mankind through metaphor. It’s got a good beat, but won’t be a hit at the disco,” DeYoung explains in his usual witty manner. One of the best songs of the year!


The Grand Finale, is a final return to The Grand Illusion, climax. It is a wonderful celebration!

DeYoung states, “My musical goals for this album were the same as they have always been and that was to write the best songs possible and make great sounding records out of them. By now, Styx fans know pretty much what they can expect and I hope they will be pleased. I am”.

The band for 26 East Volume 2, includes: Dennis DeYoung, on vocals, keyboards, and synth bass; Mike Morales, Ed Breckenfeld, Matthew DeYoung, Khari Parker, (RIP), on drums; Jim Peterik, Mike Aquino, August Zadra, Jim Leahey, on guitar; Tom Morello ‘The Great Houdini’ – guitar solo on “The Last Guitar Hero”; Jim Peterik, Jim Majors, on bass; Tim Bales, Steve Eisen, (The Ides Of March), Henry Delgado, on horns on “Hello Goodbye”; Mr.Tacit, on accordion; Jim Peterik, August Zadra, Kevin Chalfant, Suzanne DeYoung, Tito Gobi, Craig Carter, and Mike Morales, sing backing vocals; Michael Manson Gospel Group, appears on “Your Saving Grace”; Matthew DeYoung, would like to dedicate his performance on the “Grand Finale” to his mentor John Panozzo. The ride cymbal Matthew used was given to him by John.

Get this closing record from one of the best rock lyricist and music writers of the Golden Age of Rock – the 1970s and 80s. Everything here is worthy of his greatness and a finale only DeYoung could write. Well worth the time and effort.

Track Listing
1. “Hello Goodbye”
2. “Land of the Living”
3. “The Last Guitar Hero”
4. “Your Saving Grace”
5. “Proof of Heaven”
6. “Made for Each Other”
7. “There’s No Turning Back Time”
8. “St. Quarantine”
9. “So Little Did We Know”
10. “Always Time”
11. “Isle of Misanthrope”
12. “GIF”

dennisdeyoung.com
facebook.com/DennisDeYoungOfficial
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Re: Dennis DeYoung 26 East Volume 2 - REVIEWS

Postby Grotelul » Fri Jul 30, 2021 3:06 pm

Dennis stopped being great in 1979. He lost me with Babe and First Time. I was so disappointed with Cornerstone, especially after the greatness of The Grand Illusion and PO8. I cannot listen to anything new from Dennis as to me, it sounds cheesy and done on the cheap. The current Styx blows away DDY and his band of amateurs. I cringe whenever I try and listen to 26 East 1 or 2.

At least DDY was somewhat cool during the Equinox to PO8 Era. The only really good song Dennis has written from EOC to now is Goodbye Roseland. The rest can go in the garbage IMO.
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Re: Dennis DeYoung 26 East Volume 2 - REVIEWS

Postby SuiteMadameBlue » Fri Jul 30, 2021 11:43 pm

Grotelul wrote:Dennis stopped being great in 1979. He lost me with Babe and First Time. I was so disappointed with Cornerstone, especially after the greatness of The Grand Illusion and PO8. I cannot listen to anything new from Dennis as to me, it sounds cheesy and done on the cheap. The current Styx blows away DDY and his band of amateurs. I cringe whenever I try and listen to 26 East 1 or 2.

At least DDY was somewhat cool during the Equinox to PO8 Era. The only really good song Dennis has written from EOC to now is Goodbye Roseland. The rest can go in the garbage IMO.



At least you tried to listen to 26 East 1 and 2, I have to give you that. I can't listen to COTC.

I personally really love Cornerstone, it came out when I was younger, I have a lot of great memories with the songs on the album.
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Re: Dennis DeYoung 26 East Volume 2 - REVIEWS

Postby SuiteMadameBlue » Sat Jul 31, 2021 2:44 am

Grotelul wrote:Dennis stopped being great in 1979. He lost me with Babe and First Time. I was so disappointed with Cornerstone, especially after the greatness of The Grand Illusion and PO8. I cannot listen to anything new from Dennis as to me, it sounds cheesy and done on the cheap. The current Styx blows away DDY and his band of amateurs. I cringe whenever I try and listen to 26 East 1 or 2.

At least DDY was somewhat cool during the Equinox to PO8 Era. The only really good song Dennis has written from EOC to now is Goodbye Roseland. The rest can go in the garbage IMO.



In addition..........

I don’t believe that musical preferences should be debated. But facts are facts.
BOTR and Babe are their two biggest hits globally and gave Styx a presence in countries where other songs failed to. This includes many of your personal favorites. These 2 songs also lead the way in YouTube views. Why? Many people like them. Millions disagree with you concerning Babe and Cornerstone. Millions.

When Styx played Japan the promoter demanded Babe and when Dennis toured Germany the promoter asked if he would play BOTR. Both said yes.
To my knowledge no band member ever refused any royalties from Cornerstone in protest. James Young and their manager did not want BOTR on the record and said so. Neither Babe or First Time were ever discussed or objected to. Your musical tastes cannot be wrong only your judgement.
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